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The people of Nimbin have celebrated locally produced food for generations. From our grandmothers who used their own eggs, milk and butter to make award-winning sponges at the local show, to recent arrivals who harvest macadamias, roast coffee and make their own tofu. Our cheese stands testament this tradition.  Nimbin Vally Dairy lies on a winding country road between Nimbin village and Tuntable Falls in Northern NSW. It’s the home of Kerry, Paul and three sons, together with approximately 150 of the happiest free-ranging goats this side of Capricorn.  Both Kerry and Paul come from a long line of dairy farmers and share a passion for simple wholesome produce. Paul grew up on a dairy at Woodlawn near Lismore where his brother Andew, sister-in-law Kelly and baby Boyd still farm today. Paul studied at the National Centre for Dairy Education, winning the Dairy Australia Cheesemaking Scholarship in 2007. As the family cheesemaker, his talent is the product of his upbringing and a passion for creating great tasting cheeses. Kerry was raised on a dairy farm in Kyogle, where his mother can still be found making sponges and pavlovas which are renound throughout the region. After studying business and accounting at university, Kerry worked in the city for a few years, before returing to the country to provide his sons with a childhood similar to his own. As the family number-cruncher, Kerry is often the unsung hero who keeps it all ticking over behind the scenes.  Together, their produce represents five generations of Australian dairying and cheesemaking heritage. Kerry and Paul now dedicate their time to managing the farms and helping their goats and cows produce some of the best tasting produce in the region.  “Our food is what it is. No numbers in the ingredients list and no words you can’t pronounce. Just a simple pleasure we’ve enjoyed for generations and are now sharing with you”.
our animals
our philosophy
our region
The goats at Nimbin Valley spend sunny days grazing outdoors across 120 hectares of fertile green pastures. They have shelter from the rain and are happy to greet us at five o’clock each morning when it’s time for milking. Their wellbeing is a priority for us, so we don’t feed them genetically modified food or anything else we wouldn’t be happy to eat ourselves.  The goats have their own nutritionist, Bill, and vet, Ray, who help keep them happy, healthy and in top condition. Bill makes sure their diet is balanced with the correct amounts of protein, energy, minerals and vitamins. This in turn, ensures they produce the highest quality and best tasting milk.  Tonya tends to our goats and conducts regular heath checks on each and every member of the herd. If a goat is prescribed antibiotics, she is rested from the milking herd until fully recovered. This is one of the ways we keep our milk and cheeses completely free of chemicals, hormones, antibiotics and genetically modified ingredients.  In our experience, happy and contented animals yield the most wholesome and delicious produce. Try our products and taste the difference.
Our farming philosophy is very simple: from our paddocks to your plate, we aim to provide you the most wholesome and delicious food possible.  We use farming methods that closely mimic nature, and are committed to walking lightly on the Earth. Our pastures are nourished by legumes and composted manure, and pests are controlled with biological control methods instead of harmful pesticides.  Our commitment to produce food which is free of chemicals, hormones, antibiotics and genetically modified ingredients demands a different approach. This often takes a little extra time and effort on our part, but we believe that happy and healthy animals provide the best possible milk for us to turn into naturally tasty cheeses.  We invite you to taste the difference of wholesome, natural produce that works with our environment, not against it.
Nimbin is a small community of 300 people, set amidst the stunning Nightcap Ranges and rolling green hills of the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales.  The area is the traditional home of the Bundjalung people, with European settlers arriving late last century to harvest timber and establish dairy farms and banana plantations on the rich volcanic soil.  In 1973, a second wave of European settlers arrived in Nimbin during the 10 days of the famous Aquarius festival. This was a historical moment not only for Australian pop culture, but also the local region, as many people attending the festival decided to stay. This new wave of settlers relished an ‘alternative’ lifestyle, guided by a philosophy of sustainability, community and simplicity.  This philosophy continues to drive a thriving local economy of small farm-based food producers, restaurants, cafes, cooperatives, road stalls and markets showcasing some of the highest quality produce in the region.
We take the sustainability of our farm very seriously and uphold our commitment to walk lightly on our Earth.  Global Warming  We acknowledge that greenhouse gasses produced by goats and cows contribute to global warming. To offset these emissions, we began a tree planting program three years ago.  To date, we have planted enough trees to offset the annual greenhouse gas emissions from out goats. Our goal is to completely offset the emissions of our cow herd and cheese making processes within five years.  Local rainforest regenerators plant about 200 trees for us every month, using locally collected rainforest seed. So while these trees are busy offsetting our carbon emissions, they are also improving the natural biodiversity of our local area.  Reducing waste  All of our cheese and milk packaging is made of 100% recyclable plastic, which we choose over glass due to its lower level of ‘embedded energy’. We have an ongoing commitment to monitor and reduce our business waste and are always looking for new ways of reducing our environmental footprint.  Renewable energy  We use 100% ‘Green Power’ which is energy produced from renewable sources.  Farming practices  We have reduced the use of chemical fertilisers by over 80% since we started using composted animal manure as our main source of soil nutrients. This ongoing annual program has the added benefit of helping build up soil carbon, humus and organic matter which, in turn, retains soil moisture and fortifies the soil against erosion.  We have started developing our farm Environmental Management System (EMS) which will provide a documented pathway to monitor our environmental management performance. This is on track to be completed within 12 months.  Regional sustainability  Supporting local business helps keep money circulating through our local economy. We source as much as we can from small local suppliers, including the chilli jam, infused oils and basil pesto we use in our Billy range of cheeses.
milk
goats cheese
Like other natural products, goat milk is seasonal. We could use artificial lighting to maintain milk production levels throughout July and August, but choose not to treat our goats like machines. Everyone deserves a holiday! Because of this seasonality, demand often outstrips supply. This is particularly so in July and August, when milk production levels drop significantly (see graph below).  We also know that a regular milk supply is important to many people, so our milk is available both fresh and frozen in one and two litre bottles. Many of our regular customers arrange a standing order with their local suppliers to ensure a consistent milk supply throughout the year. If you are interested in setting up a similar arrangement, feel free to contact us for more information.
lemon billy
sainte billy
“Our cheese starts with the freshest milk produced by happy and contented animals in a beautiful and loving environment. I combine this perfect ingredient with my knowledge of cheesemaking to create cheeses of exceptional character”. Paul, cheesemaker  Our family and friends have enjoyed our cheeses for three generations and now you can enjoy them too.  So whether you’re sharing good food and conversation with family and friends, or a lazy afternoon with someone special, our cheese is just another way of taking time to enjoy the simple pleasures in life.
orange billy
lillian fetta
Nimbin Valley Dairy’s Billy range of soft goat curd cheeses, are made from our freshest morning milk. The milk flows directly from the dairy into the cheese vat, minimising handling and damage to the fragile milk fat. The milk is also pasteurised in the vat, ensuring the whole process is as gentle as possible. We then add culture to the milk, along with a little salt and rennet, and set it overnight at a constant temperature.  The next day, our cheesemaker Paul ladles the curds by hand into cotton cloth bags and leaves them to drain for 24 hours. During this time, the room temperature is lowered to develop the subtle flavours of our cheese.  The end product is a soft, fresh cheese. It has a luscious creamy mouth feel and tastes great with fresh sour dough or good quality crackers. We also enjoy it with seasonal fruits or a splash of fruity extra virgin olive oil. Its moderate salt level makes it suitable for both savoury and sweet dishes but traditionally, we use it to make delicious quiches, onion jam tarts and pasta.  Milk Type: goat – Nimbin Valley Dairy Classification: fresh Size: 120g & 380g Rennet: non-animal Drink suggestion: dry or fruity white wine.
basil billy
As part of our Billy range of soft goat curd cheeses, Basil Billy is made from our freshest morning milk and locally grown produce.  To make the cheese, we let the milk flow from the dairy directly into the cheese vat, minimising handling and damage to the fragile milk fat. The milk is also pasteurised in the vat, ensuring the whole process is as gentle as possible.  We then add culture to the milk, along with a little salt and rennet, and set it overnight at a constant temperature. The next day, our cheese maker Paul ladles the curds by hand into cotton cloth bags and leaves it to drain for 24 hours. During this time, the room temperature is lowered to develop the subtle flavours of our cheese.  As part of our Billy range of soft goat curd cheeses, Basil Billy is made from our freshest morning milk and locally grown produce.  Milk Type: goat – Nimbin Valley Dairy Classification: fresh cheese / dip / spreadable Size: 120g Rennet: non-animal Drink suggestion: Dry white wine or crisp wheat beer.
chilli billy
As part of our Billy range of soft goat curd cheeses, Chilli Billy is made from our freshest morning milk and locally grown produce.  To make the cheese, we let the milk flow from the dairy directly into the cheese vat, minimising handling and damage to the fragile milk fat. The milk is also pasteurised in the vat, ensuring the whole process is as gentle as possible.  We then add culture to the milk, along with a little salt and rennet, and set it overnight at a constant temperature. The next day, our cheese maker Paul ladles the curds by hand into cotton cloth bags and leaves it to drain for 24 hours. During this time, the room temperature is lowered to develop the subtle flavours of our cheese.  Our delicious chilli jam is made by Maureen at ‘All the Best Fine Foods’ who is locally and nationally renowned for her delicious jams and preserves. Maureen’s chilli jam is a mild relish-style jam with a thick, chunky consistency with the perfect balance of both sweet and sour, with a hint of ginger. Combined with the luscious, creamy mouth feel of our soft Billy cheese, Chilli Billy is a match made in heaven.  To serve Chilli Billy as a dip, simply run a knife around the edges of the pot, invert onto a serving dish, accompanied by fresh sour dough or good quality crackers. Alternately, you can use it as a spread, reseal and store it in the fridge for up to 1 week.  We love Chilli Billy on pizza; with tomato, olives, oregano and a drizzle of garlic olive oil. We also use it to spice up our favourite onion jam tart.  Milk Type: goat – Nimbin Valley Dairy Classification: fresh cheese / dip / spreadable Size: 120g Rennet: non-animal Drink suggestion: Dry white wine or crisp wheat beer
As part of our Billy range of soft goat cheeses, Orange Billy is made from our freshest morning milk and locally grown produce.  The milk flows directly from the dairy into the cheese vat, minimising handling and damage to the fragile milk fat. The milk is also pasteurised in the vat, ensuring the whole process is as gentle as possible.  We then add culture to the milk, along with a little salt and rennet, and set it overnight at a constant temperature. The next day, our cheese maker Paul ladles the curds by hand into cotton cloth bags and leaves it to drain for 48 hours. During this time, the room temperature is lowered to develop the subtle flavours of our cheese.  Because Orange Billy is drained for twice as long as the Basil and Chilli Billy cheeses, it has a much firmer consistency, enabling us to cube and marinate the cheese.  The infused grape seed oil we use to marinate our Orange Billy cheese is made especially for us by Lee at Iron Pot Foods. To make the oil, Lee hand-picks fresh rosemary from her farm, then dries and bruises the rosemary before combining it with orange zest and grape seed oil. The light, flavourless characteristics of grape seed oil make it a perfect carrier for the aromatic rosemary and orange, which are left to infuse before adding to our cubed Billy Cheese.  The result is a creamy cheese with a deliciously unique flavour. The freshness of the citrus, balanced with the subtle sweetness of orange and robust flavour of rosemary means it can be used for both sweet and savoury dishes.  The flavour of Orange Billy is perfectly suited to duck and other game-based dishes, as the sweet acidic citrus cuts through robust, heavy flavours. The consistency of the cheese is similar to fois gras and so it makes for an interesting twist to classic French and Asian dishes.  In warmer months, we use it to make a fresh summer salad, with assorted lettuce, segmented orange pieces, crushed macadamia nuts and white balsamic vinegar. It can also be used in cheesecake and to add a twist to sticky, fruity desserts. Once the cheese is finished, the delicious carrier oil can be drizzled over salad, pasta or pizza or used for marinating meats.  As with all our cheeses, Orange Billy also tastes great served simply with fresh sour dough, or good quality crackers.  Milk Type: goat – Nimbin Valley Dairy Classification: fresh marinated  Size: 325g  Rennet: non-animal  Drink suggestion: fruity white wine, light red wine such as pinot noir or dessert wine such as musket or ‘Pedro Ximenez’ sweet sherry
As part of our Billy range of soft goat cheeses, Lemon Billy is made from our freshest morning milk and locally grown produce.  The milk flows directly from the dairy into the cheese vat, minimising handling and damage to the fragile milk fat. The milk is also pasteurised in the vat, ensuring the whole process is as gentle as possible.  We then add culture to the milk, along with a little salt and rennet, and set it overnight at a constant temperature. The next day, our cheese maker Paul ladles the curds by hand into cotton cloth bags and leaves them to drain for 48 hours. During this time, the room temperature is lowered to develop the subtle flavours of our cheese.  Because Lemon Billy is drained for twice as long as the Basil and Chilli cheeses, it has a much firmer consistency, enabling us to cube and marinate the cheese.  The infused grape seed oil we use to marinate our Lemon Billy cheese is made especially for us by Lee at Iron Pot Foods. To make the oil, Lee uses hand-picked lemon myrtle and garlic grown on her farm. She dries the spices, roasts the garlic and bruises the flavours to release their aromatic oils. The light, flavourless characteristics of grape seed oil make it a perfect carrier for the three flavours, which are left to infuse before adding to our cubed Billy Cheese.  The unique citrus flavour of lemon myrtle blends perfectly with the bush pepper and roasted garlic to make our most popular cheese.  Served simply with good quality crackers or sour dough, Lemon Billy is best shared around a table with family and friends. Our favourite way of eating Lemon Billy is spread thickly on fresh toasted bread and drizzled generously with the infused grape seed oil. Now that’s cheese on toast!  We also use Lemon Billy in an onion and cheese tart, served with fresh tomato, Spanish onion, kalamata olives and white balsamic vinegar salad. Once the cheese is finished, the delicious grape seed oil can be drizzled over salad, pasta or pizza or used to marinate meats.  Milk Type: goat – Nimbin Valley Dairy Classification: fresh marinated  Size: 325g  Rennet: non-animal  Drink suggestion: Dry white wine, German pilsner or a spritzy gin and tonic
Nimbin Valley Dairy’s Lillian Fetta cheese is hand-made according to a traditional Greek recipe.  The milk flows directly from the dairy into the cheese vat, minimising handling and damage to the fragile milk fat. The milk is also pasteurised in the vat, ensuring the whole process is as gentle as possible and the volatile goat milk fats remains stable. This results in soft goaty characteristics, rather than the astringent flavour often found in commercial goat cheeses.  We then add culture to the milk, along with a little salt and rennet, and set it for a short time before gently cutting the curd to expel some moisture. Once the desired acid and moisture balance is achieved, our cheese maker Paul ladles the curd into hoops and leaves the cheese to drain for 24 hours.  The next day, Paul slices the fetta according to Greek tradition (the word ‘fetta’ in Greek, literally means ‘slice’) and places the slices in pots with salty brine. The result is a rich salty fetta, with subtle goaty notes.  If you prefer a less salty fetta, just soak the slices in water for 1 – 2 minutes to rinse off the excess brine.  We use our Lillian fetta for traditional recipes, such as spinach and fetta pie and Greek salad. It’s also great on pumpkin pizza and makes a deliciously interesting salad, tossed with beetroot, ripped greens and drizzled with a seeded mustard dressing.  Milk Type: goat – Nimbin Valley Dairy Classification: rindless brined cheese  Size: 200g  Rennet: non-animal  Drink suggestion: Fetta is commonly eaten with salads and breads so let’s think crisp whites and even sparkling wines
Feel free to contact Kerry or Paul weekdays between 9am and 4pm on:
T: 02 6689 1809 F: 02 6689 1297
E: info@nimbinvalley.com.au
A: 392 Tuntable Falls Rd, Nimbin, NSW, 2480
news
Brisbane Cheese Awards June 2010 Orange Billy – Gold medal The distinct combination of citrus, rosemary and soft curd impressed the judges at the Brisbane Cheese Awards June 2010.  3 wins at the Brisbane Exhibition 2010 Orange Billy – Silver Medal  Nimbin Valley Dairy Goat Milk – Silver Medal White Cow – Silver Medal – Our new cow’s milk camembert is one to look out for.
pasteurisation
intolerance and allergies
Lactose intolerance Both goat and cow milk contain a natural sugar called lactose, which the human body breaks down with an intestinal enzyme called ‘lactase’. Many people don’t have enough lactase to break down lactose, resulting in digestive problems. This is known as ‘lactose intolerance’.  Whilst not uncommon among adults, indigenous Australians, Asians, Africans and people from Middle Eastern cultures are more likely to be lactose intolerant than people of Northern European descent.  The levels of lactose intolerance may vary between people who are unable to digest any dairy products whatsoever, to others who can consume small amounts without experiencing any discomfort.  The good news for cheese lovers is that people with lactose intolerance can consume cheese products with little or no digestive issues. This is because almost all of the lactose in milk is consumed by the cheese starter culture during the process of converting milk to cheese.  Allergies  Cow milk is a common cause of food allergy in infants. Most children grow out of this condition by age four, although some symptoms can remain into adulthood. Many people who are allergic to cow milk can tolerate goat milk because the protein structure is different. If you fall into this category, we suggest you consult with your doctor before changing your diet.
All of the cow milk consumed by Australians has been pasteurised, simply because it is illegal to sell raw cow milk in Australia.  Pasteurised milk has been subjected to heat treatment to reduce the presence of harmful bacteria. Modern large commercial dairying involves the mass transporting and distribution of milk across vast distances and pasteurisation is a method of ensuring the milk arrives on the supermarket shelf, relatively fresh and fit for human consumption.  On the downside, the process of pasteurisation destroys some of the beneficial enzymes and proteins in milk, reduces the solubility of calcium, destroys some of the vitamins and alters the taste. For these reasons, many people prefer unpasteurised goat milk.  Because goats are free from many of the diseases of cattle, it is legal to produce and sell raw goat milk. The raw milk we produce at Nimbin Valley Dairy is bottled on our farm and delivered directly to our distributors, so it is always fresh.  We follow a strict Food Safety Plan and our farming business is independently audited every six months, ensuring our produce is safe, healthy and tastes great.
This is a classic goat cheese recipe. It contrasts the sweet, caramelised onion with the sharpness of the goat cheese and is topped off with a rich, crumbly pastry.  you will need: caramelised onion filling  1kg onions, finely sliced  125g butter  1 tub chilli billy goat cheese  (or other billy goat cheese)  short crust pastry 2 cups plain or wholemeal flour  ½ tsp salt  150g butter, cut into small cubes iced water  method: To make short crust pastry, sift flour and salt into a bowl. Gently rub in butter with fingers to make small crumbs. Add small amounts of water while mixing. Finished pastry will come away from the bowl in a soft lump. Cover with cling film and place in fridge for 30 minutes.  To make the filling, melt butter in a saucepan and add the chopped onion. Cook slowly until caramelised. This may take up to an hour.  Roll out the pastry roughly matching the shape of the baking tray. Spread the onion mixture around the middle and place teaspoons of chilli billy over the mixture. Fold the edges of the pastry back over the top of the pie to form rough sides.  Bake in oven at 180ºC until the pastry is golden, about 20 minutes.  Enjoy!  Cheesemaker’s tip: You can substitute the short crust pastry with prepared puff pastry if you’re short of time. 
basil billy goat cheese rocket and tomato pasta
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billy goat cheese and roast pumpkin pizza
caramelised onion and goat cheese tart
orange billy goat cheese and macadamia salad
beetroot and lillian fetta salad
silverbeet and fetta pie
This classic Greek pie combines earthy silverbeet, which is given a lift by chunks of salty fetta cheese. A hearty pie served warm or cold the next day.  you will need: 1 bunch of fresh silverbeet  1 medium onion  2 or 3 chopped spring onions  ½ cup chopped flat leaf parsley  2 tsp chopped fennel  ¼ tsp nutmeg  100g lillian fetta cheese  ¼ cup grated parmesan  4 lightly beaten eggs  salt and freshly ground black pepper  10 sheets of filo pastry  melted butter or olive oil  method: Wash silverbeet, remove stems and chop coarsely. Steam until wilted. Fry onion and spring onion until translucent. Combine cooked onion and silverbeet with remaining ingredients in a bowl adding salt and pepper to taste.  Brush a pie dish with melted butter or olive oil. Add a layer of pastry then brush with oil and place another sheet on top. Continue until you have used six sheets of pastry. Add the filling and then top with remaining four sheets of pastry, oiling between layers. Fold in the edges so they don’t burn. Brush the top sheet with a little oil and a small amount of water.  Bake at 180ºC for 45 minutes until golden brown.  Cheesemaker’s tip: Use frozen puff pastry instead of filo. Fry onion in a large saucepan then add chopped spinach directly to it and stir until wilted.
basil billy goat cheese, rocket and tomato pasta
This pasta dish is cooked in the same manner as an Asian noodle dish — a wok makes this easy. Good quality extra virgin olive oil is important to the flavour of this dish.  you will need: a very fresh bunch of rocket, torn or coarsely chopped  handful of cherry tomatoes, halved  1 tub basil billy goat cheese  1 small onion  2 cloves of garlic, crushed  2–3 tbs best quality extra virgin olive oil  salt and freshly ground black pepper  250g spaghetti  method:  Cook the pasta in salted water and drain.  Gently fry the onion and garlic in olive oil until they start to brown. Add the salt and pepper. Add tomatoes and cook until warmed through. Increase the heat and toss in the pasta. Stir fry for 2–3 minutes. Add rocket, stir until wilted then add dollops of basil billy cheese. Remove from heat and serve. 
To do this pizza justice it should be cooked in an outdoor wood fired oven, in summer, with friends and a good beer, however it is just as good cooked in the kitchen oven, and enjoyed with friends and family any time of the year.  you will need:  pizza dough   2 cups plain flour  1 cup warm water  2 tbs olive oil  ½ tsp salt  1 tsp dry yeast  topping 2 tbs tomato paste  1 tsp fresh oregano  ½ cup coarsely chopped basil leaves  2 cups of chopped pumpkin  olive oil, for roasting  1 tub billy goat cheese  salt and freshly ground black pepper  method:  To make pizza dough, combine dry ingredients in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre and add water and oil. Mix until combined then knead for about 20 minutes until smooth and elastic. Cover with oiled cling film and leave in a warm place until doubled in size (around 1–2 hours).  Roast the pumpkin at 180ºC until soft and starting to brown — be careful not to overcook it.  Stretch out pizza dough until it covers the pizza tray. Spread tomato paste evenly over the dough and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle oregano, then add the roasted pumpkin.  Place dollops of billy cheese around the pizza.  Bake at 220ºC for 15 minutes or until browned. Remove from oven and add basil leaves while still hot so they wilt before serving.  Cheesemaker’s tip: Use a pre-made pizza base or flat bread. Substitute roasted pumpkin for thinly sliced uncooked pumpkin. 
This salad is particularly good with grilled fish or chicken. The crunchy leaves contrast well with the creamy goat cheese and the orange oil.  you will need: small bowl of mixed salad leaves  ½ cup salted macadamia pieces  1 tub orange billy goat cheese  1 whole orange, peeled and segmented  1 tbs white balsamic vinegar  method: Peel the orange, removing the skin, pith and membrane that divides the segments. Hold the orange firmly in your hand over a bowl and gently slide the knife between the membrane walls towards the centre of the fruit to release each segment.  Roughly tear the salad leaves and place in serving bowl. Add macadamias, orange segments and chunks of goat cheese. Add two tablespoons orange billy oil to the vinegar and whisk. Pour over the salad and serve. 
The sweetness of the fresh beets contrasts beautifully with the saltiness of the fetta in this dish, while the seeded mustard adds yet another layer of sourness. The beets turn the fetta bright pink, so leave a few chunks of fetta aside and place on top of the finished salad before serving.  you will need:  1 bunch fresh beetroot  3 tbs seeded mustard  1 cup fresh basil  1 cup fresh mint  1 tub lillian fetta cheese  3 tbs balsamic vinegar  1½ tbs sugar  method: Remove stems from beetroot, leaving a couple of centimetres so they don’t bleed. Cover with water and boil until soft enough to pierce with a skewer — about twenty minutes, depending on size. When cool, rub skins off with your fingers and chop into 2cm chunks. Combine vinegar with sugar and pour over beetroot. Let stand for half an hour, stirring occasionally.  Coarsely chop the basil and mint. Add the fetta, herbs and mustard to the beetroot and stir until combined. Add the reserved fetta before serving  download pdf recipe
white goat
$11.25 each (150g)
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washed cow
$13.75 each (250g)
$12.00 each (200g)
white cow
$16.25 each (250g)
sweet goat
washed goat
Postage free for purchases over $100
blue cow
$6.50 each (60g)
$13.00 each (200g)
$15.00 each (200g)
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full moon
running cow
blue goat
orange billie
sainte billie
$6.50 each (80g)
monte nardi
lemon billie
fresh surface ripened lactic cheese. Great with bread, traditionally eaten warm drizzled with honey
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clasic greek style fetta - crumbled through salads it's a meal in itself.
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soft creamy goat cheese marinated in orange zest and rosemary.
soft creamy goat cheese marinated in lemon myrtle, bush pepper and gralic.
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semi-hard goat cheese full of flavour based on the clasic Tome de Savoir
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soft mild blue goat cheese full of nutty flavours.
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clasic camembert made from goat milk
simply one of the best goat cheeses - a washed rind style full of goat flavours.
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soft creamy brie style cheese. Excellent with fresh bread or crackers.
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semi-soft mild blue cheese. Great in salads or with crusty bread.
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hard cheese made according to the traditional methods of the Italian immigrants to the NR regions of nsw. Great table cheese and for grating and cooking.
pungent washed rind soft cheese great with fresh bread. One for the true cheese lover.
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firm, smooth lactic cheese with a yeasty rind.
soft smooth cheese in brine great in salads or spread on sandwiches
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smooth cow
$6.50 each (200g)
semi-hard alpine style cheese great for melting. Full of flavour, similar to a Swiss Raclette.
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